Homelands for the Lytton Band of Pomo Indians and federal recognition for the Little Shell Tribe are on the agenda on Capitol Hill.
For the first time, states have sued to overturn the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.
We must stand up against toxic rhetoric and brutal attacks on the rights of indigenous peoples.
Tribal leaders are expressing hope after judges on a federal appeals court questioned the attacks on the Indian Child Welfare Act.
But there is growing support for the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to receive advance funding.
Arguments are taking place in a case that tribes say goes to the very heart of their sovereignty and their relationship with the United States.


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A record number of Native Americans, including Native women, are seeking seats in the U.S. Congress. Here are the active candidates.

The House Committee on Appropriations continued an annual tradition by inviting Indian Country leaders to share their funding priorities with key members of Congress.

The Trump administration finally released its fiscal year 2020 budget and the numbers aren't looking good for Indian Country.

'Where Are They Now' sounds like an old cable television show, only this week it's about the trust and treaty responsibility.

'This is Indian land,' tribal leaders were told. But does the Trump administration believe it?

Representatives of tribal nations, Indian organizations and urban Indian providers from across the U.S. are presenting their funding priorities to Congress.

A 698-page bill that helps tribes and Alaska Natives is on its way to President Trump for his signature.

A 698-page bill that helps tribes and Alaska Natives is on its way to President Trump for his signature.

Democrats are sounding the alarm after Republicans confirmed a Trump nominee for a lifetime spot on a key federal appeals court despite Indian Country's objections.

With one figure forced out under a cloud, the official tapped to lead the Department of the Interior is promising a new era of relations with Indian Country.

The leader of the nation's largest inter-tribal organization is responding to controversy that arose at a White House tribal listening session.

President Rodney Bordeaux of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe is weighing in on a White House tribal listening session that got ugly.

A federal judge has dealt a setback to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, whose homelands have long been the subject of controversy.

The Trump administration's attempt to reset its troubled relationship with Indian Country got off to a rocky start after one tribe walked out on what was billed as a historic meeting.

The law that established the Administration for Native Americans is marking its 45th anniversary.

With key Trump officials in the audience, the nation's largest and oldest inter-tribal advocacy group opened a historic week in Washington with a stinging rebuke of the president and his policies.

A cloud is hanging over the State of Indian Nations and the National Congress of American Indians but it's still looking like a banner week in Washington, D.C.

The Indian Health Service has been without a permanent leader for four years.

After a somewhat disappointing start in the Trump era, the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs continues to hit the ground running.

'There was just no depth in regard to assisting us in Indian Country,' the vice president of the Navajo Nation said of Donald Trump's address to Congress.

President Trump proudly displays a portrait of Andrew Jackson, the architect of Indian removal, at the White House.

President Trump has failed to offer a budget for Indian Country programs but that doesn't mean Congress is shirking its trust and treaty responsibilities to tribal nations.

David Bernhardt is a familiar figure in Indian Country, having served at the Department of the Interior in the George W. Bush era.

A divided Congress and an unpredictable president spell trouble for tribes and their advocates.

With the threat of another shutdown looming, tribal leaders are supporting legislation they hope will protect their communities from the drama and disorder in the nation's capital.

There will be a lot of demand from tribes and non-profits to get cash flow restarted to pay for contracts with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service.

Efforts are building across the nation to address the crisis of missing and murdered Native women.

Things are not looking good for the People of the First Light, whose homelands are in danger of being taken out of trust by the Trump administration.

As the shutdown debate drags on in Washington, tribal leaders were meeting thousands of miles away to assert their rights.

Tribes are growing increasingly alarmed by the never-ending government shutdown that has no solution in sight.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will be hearing arguments in a dispute between the Swinomish Tribe and rail company in Washington state.