The disappearance and murder of indigenous girls and women in Canada is a genocide that the government is responsible for.
For more than 100 years, Native children in Maine were removed from their homes by state authorities and placed with White families in an attempt to erase their indigenous identity.
For too long we political scientists in Canada have been bystanders to discussions about cultural genocide and genocide.
Canadian constitutional law and Aboriginal law are not likely what comes to mind when identifying the cause of a wildfire disaster.
The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls final report concludes that the long-term and ongoing murders and disappearances is an ongoing genocide.
After a blockbuster season in which tribal treaties have been front and center, it looks like the Supreme Court is taking a little break from Indian Country.


One genocide is never the same as another, and therefore a static law or a fixed concept of genocide is of little use to protect us from its horrors.

Two studies published in the journal Nature attempt to shed light on the genetic origins of American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Native peoples

The murder and disappearance of Indigenous women and girls are occurring at stunning rates at both sides of the Medicine Line, with shared historical reasons.

If hockey is to bring people together and foster what’s best about Canada, it needs to reckon with a history of racism and settler colonialism.

Reporting on Indigenous peoples has increased the pressure to acknowledge everyday racism, institutional racism and the challenges of reconciliation.

Addressing climate change in Indigenous contexts requires leadership from Indigenous peoples, communities, organizations and governments.

Indigenous leaders call climate change an urgent threat that requires a global response. But that idea was trashed by the Trump administration.

Our project, MappingBack, envisions mapping as a weapon and tactic to resist extractive industries on Indigenous lands.

I know one thing: we must not cede our rights to be heard and to demand justice.

Rick Desautel, a Colville veteran who lives in the U.S., has once again won the right to hunt on ancestral territory across the border.

Are you ready for the Duluth Eskimos? Because someone in the NFL thinks it's 'cool.'

This is what a feminist looks like, Prime Minister Trudeau.

Instead of waiting for answers from police, Indigenous communities are scanning hillsides and riverbeds—and helping families cope.

An end to infighting is in sight if we can stand and see it beginning with the demanding what is ours.

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation's sovereign boundaries and the Crow Tribe's treaty rights are at stake before the highest court in the land.

'The Fourth World' by George Manuel richly deserves its status as a foundational work.

Over the past 20 years, the courts have validated long-standing claims by First Nations that Canadian governments have systematically ignored and violated the terms of treaties negotiated between 1871 and 1921.

If we add up all the ways that Canadian governments have oppressed Indigenous peoples over the centuries, those governments bear a weighty burden.

The Doctrine of Discovery is a legal fiction. It justifies Indigenous dispossession by discounting Indigenous history, legal orders, sovereignty and existence.

Native women are changing the narrative as they continue to secure safety for their sisters.

Xwi7xwa library in British Columbia is working to decolonize the way libraries organize information.

Life was already difficult for Native Americans who live along – and across – the border even before President Donald Trump declared a national emergency.

In the 1950s an Indigenous woman could not even hire a lawyer but in 2019 Jody Wilson-Raybould teaches a masters’ class in the rule of law.

Anna Mae Pictou Aquash was one of the original missing and murdered indigenous women whose life and death sparked the #MMIW movement.

Marijuana was given to the human people to do exactly what it does best: heal.

'Weavings explain where we came from and who we are.'

It seems only western science can be championed as objective, reliable and neutral.

It’s the land that brings us together, the land that teaches relationship-based ways of knowing about the natural world and its food systems.

Tribal governments continue to press to be included in the debate about international borders and security, including a proposal to include an Indigenous-only visa.

It’s important that settlers understand what Unist'ot'en represents in the era of reconciliation currently being promoted by governments in Canada.