Posted: September 19, 2017
More: jamestown s'klallam, land-into-trust, washington

This notice informs the public that the Acting Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs proclaimed approximately 267.29 acres, more or less, an addition to the reservation of the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe on July 21, 2017.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by part 209 of the Departmental Manual.


A proclamation was issued according to the Act of June 18, 1934 (48 Stat. 986; 25 U.S.C. 5110) for the land described below. The land was proclaimed to be the Jamestown S'Klallam Reservation for the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, State of Washington.



Posted: September 14, 2017
More: bie

The U.S. Department of the Interior is announcing its intent to establish the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) Standards, Assessments, and Accountability System Negotiated Rulemaking Committee (Committee) to advise the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) through the BIE on a proposed rule to revise the Adequate Yearly Progress regulation and invite Tribes whose students attend BIE-funded schools operated by either the BIE or by the Tribe through a contract or grant who would be affected by the final rule to nominate a representative for membership on the Committee. The BIE also invites nominations for Committee members who will adequately represent the interests that are likely to be significantly affected by the proposed rule such as: Students enrolled, or parents of students enrolled at the 174 BIE-funded schools, school teachers and administrators, Tribes, and Indian communities served by these schools. The BIE also solicits comments on the proposal to establish the Committee.



Posted: September 11, 2017
More: bie, meetings, new mexico

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is announcing a public meeting of the Advisory Board for Exceptional Children (Advisory Board). The purpose of the meeting is to meet the mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) for Indian children with disabilities.


Orientation training will be conducted for new Advisory Board members on Wednesday, September 20, 2017, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mountain Time. Thereafter, on Thursday, September 21, 2017, and Friday, September 22, 2017, all Advisory Board members will meet in-session from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mountain Time.

In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the BIE is announcing that the Advisory Board will hold its next meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Advisory Board was established under the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.) to advise the Secretary of the Interior, through the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, on the needs of Indian children with disabilities. The meetings are open to the public.



Posted: September 6, 2017
More: hearth act, stillaguamish, washington

On July 17, 2017, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) approved the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians' leasing regulations under the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Homeownership (HEARTH) Act. With this approval, the Tribe is authorized to enter into the following types of leases without BIA approval: Agricultural, residential, business, wind and solar, wind energy evaluation, and other authorized purposes.


The HEARTH Act of 2012 (the Act) makes a voluntary, alternative land leasing process available to Tribes, by amending the Indian Long-Term Leasing Act of 1955, 25 U.S.C. 415. The Act authorizes Tribes to negotiate and enter into agricultural and business leases of Tribal trust lands with a primary term of 25 years, and up to two renewal terms of 25 years each, without the approval of the Secretary of the Interior (the Secretary). The Act also authorizes Tribes to enter into leases for residential, recreational, religious or educational purposes for a primary term of up to 75 years without the approval of the Secretary. Participating Tribes develop Tribal leasing regulations, including an environmental review process, and then must obtain the Secretary's approval of those regulations prior to entering into leases. The Act requires the Secretary to approve Tribal regulations if the Tribal regulations are consistent with the Department's leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162 and provide for an environmental review process that meets requirements set forth in the Act. This notice announces that the Secretary, through the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, has approved the Tribal regulations for the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians.



Posted: September 6, 2017
More: hearth act, oklahoma, osage

On July 17, 2017, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) approved the Osage Nation (Nation) leasing regulations under the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Homeownership Act of 2012 (HEARTH Act). With this approval, the Nation is authorized to enter into business site leases without further BIA approval.


The HEARTH Act makes a voluntary, alternative land leasing process available to Tribes, by amending the Indian Long-Term Leasing Act of 1955, 25 U.S.C. 415. The HEARTH Act authorizes Tribes to negotiate and enter into agricultural and business leases of Tribal trust lands with a primary term of 25 years, and up to two renewal terms of 25 years each, without the approval of the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary). The HEARTH Act also authorizes Tribes to enter into leases for residential, recreational, religious or educational purposes for a primary term of up to 75 years without the approval of the Secretary. Participating Tribes develop Tribal leasing regulations, including an environmental review process, and then must obtain the Secretary's approval of those regulations prior to entering into leases. The HEARTH Act requires the Secretary to approve Tribal regulations if the Tribal regulations are consistent with the Department of the Interior's (Department) leasing regulations at 25 CFR part 162 and provide for an environmental review process that meets requirements set forth in the HEARTH Act. This notice announces that the Secretary, through the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, has approved the Tribal regulations for the Osage Nation.



Posted: September 6, 2017
More: lac courte oreilles, land-into-trust, wisconsin

This notice informs the public that the Acting Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs proclaimed approximately 2012.77 acres, more or less, an addition to the reservation of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians on July 21, 21017.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by part 209 of the Departmental Manual.


A proclamation was issued according to the Act of June 18, 1934 (48 Stat. 986; 25 U.S.C. 5110) for the lands described below. These lands are proclaimed to be part of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin Reservation, in Sawyer County, Wisconsin.



Posted: September 1, 2017
More: dc, energy, meetings

This notice announces the first meeting of the Royalty Policy Committee (Committee). This meeting is open to the public.


The Committee meeting will be held on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Washington, DC, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time.


The U.S. Department of the Interior established the Committee on April 21, 2017, under the authority of the Secretary of the Interior and regulated by the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the Committee is to ensure that the public receives the full value of the natural resources produced from Federal lands. The duties of the Committee are solely advisory in nature. More information about the Committee, including its charter, is available at www.doi.gov/​rpc.



Posted: August 30, 2017
More: minnesota, museums, nagpra

The Science Museum of Minnesota, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Science Museum of Minnesota. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


In July of 1958, two cultural items were removed from the Nett Lake region in Koochiching and St. Louis Counties, MN. Karen Peterson, a Science Museum of Minnesota affiliate, purchased the items on the Museum's behalf. One item, a drum, was purchased from Mrs. Ray Drift. The other item, a drumstick, was purchased from Mr. Walter Drift. Both sellers were members of the Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake), one of six reservations that, together, comprise the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. The two items go together. The two sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony are one drum and one drumstick.


Museum accession, catalogue, collector notes and purchase records, as well as consultation with representatives of the Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota, indicate that the two cultural objects are Ojibwe, are from the Nett Lake Reservation, MN, and are sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. On April 18, 2017, Science Museum of Minnesota officials met with members of the Bois Forte Band. Elders, spiritual advisors, and five drum-keepers from the Bois Forte Band were present at the meeting, and each in turn explained the spiritual and sacred importance of drums both to the Ojibwe in general, and to the Bois Forte Band in particular. According to the group, drums are treated as living beings, and are cared for by a drum-keeper as long as that drum-keeper is able. If a drum-keeper can no longer care for a drum, it is passed on to another drum-keeper. Supernatural beings bestow the honor and duty of caring for a drum through dreams and visions. Ceremonial songs and dances associated with drums are similarly revealed. According to the informants' testimonies, the investiture and traditional religious practices of drum-keepers, and the drums used in such practices are central to Ojibwe religion and the Bois Forte Band. Drums made by this community belong to the community, and are not the property of drum-keepers or any other custodian. According to the elders, spiritual advisors, and drum-keepers present during consultation, the drum and drumstick should never have been sold, and should be returned.



Posted: August 30, 2017
More: arkansas, nagpra

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Tonto National Forest, has completed an inventory of unassociated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the unassociated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these cultural items should submit a written request to the Tonto National Forest. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Prior to 1990, 11 unassociated funerary objects were removed from Six Shooter Canyon in Gila County, AZ. The unassociated funerary objects were donated to the Grand Canyon Museum and then transferred to the Tonto National Forest on December 29, 2016. The 11 unassociated funerary objects are three shell bracelets, three shell rings, and five turquoise tessera pieces. A detailed assessment of the unassociated funerary objects was made by the Tonto National Forest professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, who submitted a repatriation claim for the cultural items.


In accordance with the Plan for the Treatment and Disposition of Human Remains and Other Cultural Items from the Tonto National Forest Pursuant to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (as revised in 2001), it has been determined that the primary cultural affiliation of these unassociated funerary objects is with the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona.



Posted: August 28, 2017
More: museums, napgra, new york

The Brooklyn Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribe, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of sacred object and object of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Brooklyn Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the Indian Tribe stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, that meets the definition of sacred object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.


This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.



Posted: August 28, 2017
More: colorado, museums, pueblo

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, that meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.


This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.



Posted: August 28, 2017
More: museums, napgra, texas

The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


On February 15, 1978, The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History acquired one yucca, stair-step basket, object identification number 31N.00139, from Lew Meekins. No other provenance information is available.


Museum accession and catalog records, as well as consultations with a representative of the Santa Rosa Rancheria Tachi Tribe, in Lemoore, CA, indicated that the basket is of Yokut design, and would have been utilized during the Tribe's Traditional Coming of Age Ceremonies. The representative of the Santa Rosa Rancheria Tachi Tribe also provided supporting ethnographic documentation for the cultural significance of the object.



Posted: August 28, 2017
More: nagpra, tennessee

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Further, TVA has determined that a cultural affiliation between the unassociated funerary objects and present-day federally recognized Indian Tribes can be reasonably traced. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to TVA. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, which meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.


This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.



Posted: August 28, 2017
More: arizona, museums, nagpra

The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, have determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.


Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (ASM) that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.


This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.



Posted: August 22, 2017
More: treaties

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (hereinafter, Service or we) proposes special migratory bird hunting regulations for certain Tribes on Federal Indian reservations, off-reservation trust lands, and ceded lands for the 2017-18 migratory bird hunting season.


As part of DOI's retrospective regulatory review, we developed a schedule for migratory game bird hunting regulations that is more efficient and will provide dates much earlier than was possible under the old process. This will facilitate planning for the States and all parties interested in migratory bird hunting. Beginning in the summer of 2015, with the development of the 2016-17 hunting seasons, we are using a new schedule for establishing our annual migratory game bird hunting regulations. We will combine the current early- and late-season regulatory actions into a single process, based on predictions derived from long-term biological information and harvest strategies, to establish migratory bird hunting seasons much earlier than the system we have used for many years. Under the new process, we will develop proposed hunting season frameworks for a given year in the fall of the prior year. We will finalize those frameworks a few months later, thereby enabling the State agencies to select and publish their season dates in early summer. This rulemaking is part of that process.


We developed the guidelines for establishing special migratory bird hunting regulations for Indian Tribes in response to tribal requests for recognition of their reserved hunting rights and, for some Tribes, recognition of their authority to regulate hunting by both tribal and nontribal hunters on their reservations.



Posted: August 21, 2017
More: grants, suicide

The Indian Health Service (IHS), Office of Clinical and Preventive Service, Division of Behavioral Health (DBH), is accepting applications for cooperative agreements for Zero Suicide Initiative (ZSI)—to develop a comprehensive model of culturally informed suicide care within a system of care framework. This program was first established by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017, Public Law 115-31, 131 Stat. 135 (2017). This program is authorized under the Snyder Act, 25 U.S.C. 13 and the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, Subchapter V-A (Behavioral Health Programs), 25 U.S.C. 1665 et seq.


For at least the past fifteen years deaths by suicide have been steadily increasing. On April 22, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics released a data report, Increase in Suicide in the United States, 1999-2014, which underscores this fact.

  • From 1999 through 2014, the age-adjusted suicide rate in the United States increased 24%, from 10.5 to 13.0 per 100,000 population, with the pace of increase greater after 2006.
  • Suicide rates increased from 1999 through 2014 for both males and females and for all ages 10-74.
  • The percent increase in suicide rates for females was greatest for those aged 10-14, and for males, those aged 45-64.

The most frequent suicide method in 2014 for males involved the use of firearms (55.4%), while poisoning was the most frequent method for females (34.1%).


There is a sizable disparity when comparing the rate for the general U.S. population to the rate for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). During 2007-2009, the suicide rate for AI/ANs was 1.6 times greater than the U.S. all-races rate for 2008 (18.5 vs. 11.6 per 100,000 population).[1]


The `Zero Suicide' initiative is a key concept of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP) and is a priority of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance). The `Zero Suicide' model focuses on developing a system-wide approach to improving care for individuals at risk of suicide who are currently utilizing health and behavioral health systems. This award will support implementation of the `Zero Suicide' model within federal, Tribal, and urban Indian health care facilities and systems that provide direct care services to AI/AN in order to raise awareness of suicide, establish integrated system of care, and improve outcomes for such individuals.


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