Federal Register


Posted: November 12, 2019
More: nebraska, tennessee

The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology (UTK) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District (Omaha District), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to UTK and Omaha District. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: arkansas, nagpra

The Arkansas Archeological Survey has corrected an inventory of human remains published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on February 24, 2017. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: arkansas, napgra

The Arkansas Archeological Survey has corrected an inventory of human remains published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on December 22, 2014. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: arkansas, napgra

The Arkansas Archeological Survey has corrected an inventory of human remains published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on February 24, 2017. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Arkansas Archeological Survey. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: california, nagpra

The Department of Anthropology at San Jose State University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, San Jose State University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: massachusetts, museums, nagpra

The Robert S. Peabody Institute of Archaeology (formerly the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology) has corrected an inventory of associated funerary objects, published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on September 22, 2017 and amended in a Notice of Inventory Completion Correction published in the Federal Register on January 30, 2018. This notice further corrects the number of associated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Robert S. Peabody Institute of Archaeology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: napgra, south dakota

The South Dakota State Historical Society, Archaeological Research Center has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the South Dakota State Historical Society, Archaeological Research Center. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: nagpra, tennessee

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: dc, nagpra

The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on February 8, 2019. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects.



Posted: November 12, 2019
More: nagpra, tennessee

The University of Tennessee, Department of Anthropology (UTK) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District (Omaha District) have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to UTK and Omaha District. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.



Posted: November 8, 2019
More: agua caliente, california, gaming, ira, land-into-trust

The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs made a final agency determination to acquire 13.3 acres, more or less, of land in trust for the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California, for gaming and other purposes on October 7, 2019.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by 209 Departmental Manual 8.1, and is published to comply with the requirements of 25 CFR 151.12(c)(2)(ii) that notice of the decision to acquire land in trust be promptly provided in the Federal Register.


On October 7, 2019 the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs made a final agency determination to transfer the Section 33 Parcel consisting of approximately 13.3 acres, more or less, into trust for the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California (Tribe), pursuant to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, 25 U.S.C. 5108. The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs also determined that the Tribe's request also meets the requirements of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act's “contiguous lands” exception, 25 U.S.C. 2719(b)(1)(a), to the general prohibition contained in 25 U.S.C. 2719(a) on gaming on lands acquired in trust after October 17, 1988.


The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior, will immediately acquire title to the Section 33 Parcel, in the name of the United States of America in Trust for the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente



Posted: November 5, 2019
More: donald trump, native american heritage month

American Indians and Alaska Natives continue to make immeasurable contributions to our Nation. We honor the sacrifices many tribal citizens have made in defense of our great Nation. We also recognize that our culture is more vibrant because of the special government-to-government relationship between the United States and Indian tribes. During National Native American Heritage Month, we reaffirm our commitment to work with tribal communities to address serious issues affecting them and to help protect their rich and diverse heritage.


Few acts of service better embody the intrepid spirit of our country than the willingness to answer the call of duty and defend our Nation's precious liberties. American Indians and Alaska Natives have done so at one of the highest rates of any ethnic group in the United States, serving admirably in every branch of our military. Their legacy of service spans the history of our Nation, and includes the Indian Home Guard during the Civil War and the Code Talkers during World War II. Today, 31,000 courageous men and women from American Indian and Alaska Native communities serve on active duty in our Armed Forces.


My Administration is committed to advancing shared priorities with tribal governments and leaders to address their most pressing challenges, including the devastating threat posed by drugs. In 2018, the Department of Interior's Opioid Reduction Task Force seized more than 3,200 pounds of illegal narcotics with an estimated value of approximately $9 million. In addition to our efforts to address the drug crisis, we are focused on healthcare access, delivery, and safety. In March 2019, my Administration created a task force charged with developing recommendations to protect Native American children receiving care at Indian Health Service clinics, and we look forward to continuing these efforts.


Additionally, my Administration began a series of public safety listening sessions with American Indian and Alaska Native tribal leaders and communities. These sessions, which are called Reclaiming our Native Communities, are focused on strategies to address the trend of violence and illicit activity affecting these populations and have addressed the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women. So far, these sessions have been held in Sacaton, Arizona; Nome and Bethel, Alaska; and Rapid City, South Dakota. Through collaboration with Federal, State, local, and tribal partners, we will continue working to address these and other issues that American Indian and Alaska Native communities face today.


My Administration has also played a role in helping to preserve the proud heritage of American Indians and Alaska Natives. In October, my Administration was pleased to secure the commitment of President Sauli Niinisto of Finland to facilitate the historic return of ancestral remains and artifacts to an assembly of 26 pueblos and tribes in the Mesa Verde region. More than 600 items of cultural patrimony will be returned to this region, which includes areas of Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico.


During National Native American Heritage Month, we affirm our commitment to working toward a society that fosters a deeper understanding and appreciation for the diversity of culture and history of the 573 federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native nations in our country. This November and every month, we celebrate the culture and heritage of these remarkable Americans who deeply enrich the quality and character of our Nation.


NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2019 as National Native American Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to commemorate this month with appropriate programs and activities and to celebrate November 29, 2019, as Native American Heritage Day.



Posted: November 1, 2019
More: eis, energy, kansas, oklahoma, texas

In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) have prepared a Final Joint Environmental Impact Statement (FJEIS) for the BLM Proposed Resource Management Plan (P-RMP), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Proposed Integrated Resource Management Plan (P-IRMP) for the BLM Oklahoma Field Office, the BIA Eastern Oklahoma Regional Office, and the BIA Southern Plains Regional Office, and by this Notice is announcing the opening of the protest period.


In the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas FJEIS/BLM P-RMP/BIA P-IRMP, the BLM and BIA analyze the environmental consequences of four alternatives under consideration for managing Federal lands and minerals within the Oklahoma-Kansas-Texas planning area. The BLM Oklahoma Field Office administers approximately 15,100 acres of public surface estate, including approximately 11,833 acres at the Cross Bar Management Area near Amarillo, Texas; about 3,300 acres of small tracts scattered across the planning area; and Federal lands along the 116-mile stretch of the Red River between the North Fork of the Red River and the 98th Meridian. No exact acreages of Federal lands along the Red River are available at this time because the full 116-mile stretch of land has not been surveyed. The Oklahoma Field Office also administers approximately 4,810,900 acres of subsurface Federal mineral estate across the 269,650,000-acre planning area, to include approximately 4,012,400 acres underlying surface estate managed by other Federal surface management agencies, such as U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, and National Park Service, and approximately 785,300 acres of split-estate, where Federal minerals underlie private surface estate.


The BIA decision area includes approximately 394,200 surface acres and 2,033,500 mineral estate acres for the BIA Eastern Oklahoma Regional Office. Approximately 1,474,500 acres of the BIA Eastern Oklahoma Regional Office jurisdictional area is limited to coal or other minerals in Osage County. The BIA decision area also includes approximately 457,500 surface acres and 632,000 mineral estate acres for the BIA Southern Plains Regional Office. This includes lands and mineral estate in Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, and Richardson County, Nebraska.


The BLM is the lead agency for development of the land use plan, while the BIA Regional Offices are co-lead planning partners on this joint, integrated land use planning effort. The Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas FJEIS/BLM P-RMP/BIA P-IRMP provides a comprehensive, integrated land use plan that will replace the BLM's current 1994 Oklahoma RMP, as amended; the 1991 Kansas RMP; and the 1996 Texas RMP, as amended. Land use plan revision and consolidation is necessary due to numerous changes, including renewable energy, recreation, special status species, visual resources, and wildlife habitat which have occurred across the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas planning area since previous plan publications. New resource data are available for consideration, and new policies, guidelines, and laws have been established.



Posted: November 1, 2019
More: gaming, igra, land-into-trust, oklahoma, pawnee

The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs made a final agency determination to acquire 20.00 acres, more or less, of land near the City of Pawnee, Pawnee County, Oklahoma, (Site) in trust for the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma for gaming and other purposes on October 7, 2019.


This notice is published in the exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs by 209 Departmental Manual 8.1, and is published to comply with the requirements of 25 CFR 151.12(c)(2)(ii) that notice of the decision to acquire land in trust be promptly provided in the Federal Register.


On October 7, 2019, the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs made a final agency determination to transfer the Site, consisting of approximately 20.00 acres, more or less, into trust for the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma (Nation) pursuant to the Indian Reorganization Act, 25 U.S.C. 5108. The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs also determined that the Site meets the requirements of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, see 25 U.S.C. 2719(a)(2)(A)(i).


The Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs, on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior, will immediately acquire title to the Site in the name of the United States of America in trust for the Nation upon fulfillment of Departmental requirements.



Posted: October 31, 2019
More: probate

The Department of the Interior (Department) is considering potential updates to regulations governing probate of property that the United States holds in trust or restricted status for American Indians. Since the regulations were revised in 2008, the Department identified opportunities for improving the probate process. The Department is seeking Tribal input and public comment on its ideas for improvements in the regulations in general, and on the potential regulatory changes identified below in particular.


The Department probates thousands of estates each year for American Indian individuals who own trust or restricted property. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA), and the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) each play a role in the probate process. BIA compiles the information necessary to build a case record (i.e., the probate file) and then transfers the record to OHA for a judge to hold a hearing and issue a final probate decision. In accordance with the judge's final probate decision, BIA distributes the trust or restricted real property (“land”) and OST distributes the trust personalty (“trust funds”) from the estate.


After the American Indian Probate Reform Act (AIPRA) was enacted in 2004, the Department codified regulations implementing it at 43 CFR part 30 for the OHA adjudication process and at 25 CFR part 15 for the BIA and OST portions of the probate process. In an effort to streamline the process and benefit Indian heirs and devisees, the Department is in the process of identifying where improvements can be made through regulatory change.


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