Editorial: Address violence in Indian Country
"The statistics are frightening, and something has to change.

Between 1992 and 2002, Native Americans were victims of violent crime at twice the rate of the general population, according to Department of Justice statistics.

One in three Native American women will be raped at some point in their lives, according to an Amnesty International report.

But cases referred to U.S. attorneys are far less likely to be prosecuted if the crime occurred on tribal land.

In recent weeks Sen. John Thune has expressed commitment to these issues - words he's followed with actions.

Speaking before the Senate, Thune said he is determined to put an end to the proliferation of violent crime on reservations in South Dakota and elsewhere. Thune introduced an amendment that would have provided an additional $20 million for U.S. attorneys working in Indian Country to help overcome some of the problems that lead to the low prosecution rate for reservation crimes: an overall lack of resources and the geographic remoteness that makes transporting witnesses difficult."

Get the Story:
Editorial: Congressional support needed for tribes (The Sioux Falls Argus Leader 10/25)

Amnesty International Report:
Full Report | Press Release

Online Discussion:
Violence against Native American and Alaska Native Women (April 24, 2007)

Relevant Links:
Join Voices with Native American and Alaska Native Women and Take Action to Stop the Violence - http://www.amnestyusa.org/maze

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