Health

CDC report takes look at racial and ethnic health disparities in US





A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention highlights racial and ethnic health disparities for the first time.

According to the report, American Indians and Alaska Natives are twice as likely to die in motor vehicle crashes than other racial or ethnic groups.

The report also said the suicide rate among American Indians and Alaska Natives is more than twice that of African-Americans, Asian Pacific Islanders and Hispanics.

The HIV infection rate among American Indians and Alaska Natives is also rising, the report said, although it's not as high as that among African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Hawaiians.

Binge drinking among American Indians and Alaska Natives tends to be more serious than among other racial or ethnic groups, the report said. Native Americans report more binge drinking episodes per month and higher alcohol consumption per episode than other groups.

Tobacco use among American Indians and Alaska Natives remains extremely high, the report said.

Nearly 37 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives lack health insurance, according to the report. That's second only to Hispanics and higher than other racial or ethnic groups.

The infant mortality rate among American Indians and Alaska Natives was also high, second only to that of African-Americans.

Get the Story:
Broad Racial Disparities Seen in Americans’ Ills (The New York Times 1/14)

Get the Report:
CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011 (January 14, 2011)